Orbital Tumors

Orbital Tumors

Numerous growths, both benign and malignant, affect the orbital tissues and bones around the eyes. More often than not, they require biopsy or complete excision for the most accurate diagnosis and management. Rarely, they can be diagnosed by specific radiographic features by an MRI or CT and be observed if they are felt to be benign before potentially risky surgery is performed. Some suspected tumors turn out to be vascular (blood vessel) anomalies and can be handled by interventional radiologists. Orbital surgery can be very risky and is generally only handled by fellowship-trained oculofacial plastic surgeon subspecialists like Dr. Burroughs. Even in Dr. Burroughs “non-academic center” office-based practice, he has seen some rare tumors and shares his experiences with colleagues through peer reviewed publications as well as giving talks at national and international meeting symposia. Sometimes, Dr. Burroughs collaborates with other surgeons (e.g., ENT) for the safest and most thorough approach to orbital surgery.

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